2012 Past Events

This is an archive of our 2012 past events and workshops.

January 3 – February 7, 2012 (every Tuesday)

Location: NC Cooperative Extension, 208 West Chestnut Street, Goldsboro, NC 27530, Kitchen (Room 105)

Questions: Call Diane at 919-731-1525 or Bill Thering at 919 -738-1983 or go to: www.neuseregionalbeekeepers.org

Instructor: Bill Thering, President, Neuse Regional Beekeepers Assoc.

This six week course is designed to introduce students to honey bee biology and teach the fundamental principles of beekeeping management including crop pollination and honey production. Course materials taught in this class prepare participants to become NCSBA Certified Beekeepers. Ownership of bees or bee experience is not required. Includes book and 1 year membership to Neuse Regional Beekeepers Association Registration:

If you have taken a class from the Neuse Regional Beekeepers Association in the past you are welcome to sit in on these classes free of charge.

Sponsored by: Neuse Regional Beekeepers Association in partnership with NC Cooperative Extension.

January 19th, 2012

Join us for this full day seminar as we examine the management of small flocks from basic forage management to processing. This workshop is brought to you through a Chatham County Cooperative Extension, American Livestock Breeds Conservancy and CEFS partnership.

For more information on this workshop, please contact Dan Campeau at 919-548-9895.

January 24 – Guilford County
January 31 – Watauga County
February 1 – Gaston County
February 16 – Lenoir County, 2012

Brought to you by Carolina Farm Stewardship Association

Want to harness the power of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to reach new customers and grow your farm business? You won’t want to miss this all-day hands-on workshop designed especially for farmers and taught by social media experts, Johanna Kramer (@durhamfoodie) Cary and Grace Kanoy (GeoCore Films). You will leave this workshop with a fully-functioning Facebook and Twitter page (or upgrade your existing pages), the skills to shoot your own short farm video using your cell phone, camera, or iPad, and the training to take better farm photos. Includes lunch.

Visit the CFSA website for more information.

This workshop is funded by a grant from the Golden LEAF foundation.

January 25-26th, 2012

We will explore agroforestry opportunities in the region because many woodland owners and farmers and are struggling to make a livelihood o­n small acreage farms. They often have limited financial means and are seeking ways to maximize their income per acre, while keeping their requirement for purchased inputs low. Production systems need to become more diverse. New crops and new production methods need to be embraced. Cost-effective alternatives that can meet environmental goals and increase profits need to be available to producers. That’s where agroforestry comes in the picture. Most agroforestry practices are designed to be readily integrated into existing farm operations. Three agroforestry practices (i.e., Forest farming, Riparian Buffers and Silvopasture) will be examined by a panel of extension specialists, USDA Agency personnel, county extension agents and selected experienced farmers/woodland owners. We will use two major case studies/scenarios with issues and questions that you might encounter as an educator or trainer /advisor with your audience in riparian buffer, silvopasture and in forest farming industry and each participant will be asked to review and edit several fact sheets to be used by the public in the future.

January 19, West District
February 1, North Central District
February 2, Northeast District
February 15, South Central District, 2012

Agent Training for Support of Beginning Farmers: Land Access, Capital / Credit, and Business Planning

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) will facilitate this training focused on making support for beginning farmers an integral part of CEFS’ 10% Campaign. Instructors (noted on registration form) will use a ‘train the trainer’ approach to present and discuss some of the top challenges facing beginning farmers in North Carolina: land access, capital /credit, business planning. This training is supported by the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This training is open to all Extension agents, directors and Local Food Coordinators.

Topics: Land Access, Capital /Credit, Business Planning

Instructors: Andrew Branan, Tony Kleese, Rick Larson, Scott Marlow, Noah Ranells (speakers will vary from district to district)

A beginning farmer(s) from the district will speak from his/her experience in getting started, and we also hope to include a peer to peer opportunity to hear successes from an Agent who works regularly with beginning farmers. Instructors will use a ‘train the trainer’ approach to present and discuss some of the top challenges facing beginning farmers in North Carolina.

This project is supported by the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, grant number #2010-49400-21733.

Please contact Joanna Lelekacs with any questions – joanna_lelekacs@ncsu.edu, 919-515-1195.

February 13 & 14th, 2012

Make plans to attend the Grazing Workshop at Brad Storie’s Farm, Monday, February 13, 2012 for a great educational program. There will be a demonstration to show the benefits of stockpiling fescue and how rotational grazing can save you money, time and keep your cattle in good condition. This grazing program will be Monday, February 13, from 9:00 – 11:30 AM, at Brad Storie’s farm in Hamptonville. The farm is located at 1201 Three Oaks Rd. Look for signs on Hwy 21 North. We had this program last year generating interest in learning more about stockpiling fescue and rotational grazing to reduce hay needs and save money. There will be an additional visit to Mike Jones farm in Surry County that afternoon, from 1:30 – 3:30 PM for a different view of this management practice. There will be NC State and NRCS Specialists discussing this program and answering questions. If you want to learn how to save money and feed less hay, come to Brad Storie’s on Monday, February 13, from 9 – 11:30 AM. For more information or directions, contact the Cooperative Extension Center in Davie County at 753-6100.

February 3, Wadesboro Park, Anson
February 7, NCA&T SU University Farm, Greensboro
February 17, Muddy Creek Farm, Morganton, 2012

We are very happy to help Dr Isikhuemhen announce his annual Shiitake Mushroom Production workshops! These workshops will be applicable for both ‘seasoned’ producers as well as new farmers.

Farmers in the program who are already in production can place order for spawn with the county extension agents. Spawn will be ready as from mid-February.

New farmers can get spawn only if they will inoculate a minimum of two hundred (200) logs. New farmers will only be given spawn after they attend one of our workshops.

February 18th, 2012

There is no cost for this workshop, but registration is required by February 15th. Workshop participants will meet at the CEFS Service Building for a short classroom presentation and then participants will travel to CEFS Small Farm Unit for the pruning demonstration portion of the workshop. Directions will be provided at the beginning of the workshop. Participants are encouraged to bring hand pruners and dress appropriately for outdoor demonstration.

February 25th, 2012

We are very happy to help Dr Isikhuemhen announce his annual Shiitake Mushroom Production workshops! These workshops will be applicable for both ‘seasoned’ producers as well as new farmers.

Farmers in the program who are already in production can place order for spawn with the county extension agents. Spawn will be ready as from mid-February.

New farmers can get spawn only if they will inoculate a minimum of two hundred (200) logs. New farmers will only be given spawn after they attend one of our workshops.

March 3rd, 2012

This workshop is designed for first-time ginger growers. Presenter Susan Anderson of East Branch Ginger will give an overview of edible ginger (Zingiber officinale) production. There is no cost for this workshop, but registration is required by March 1st. Please call Diane at 919-731-1525 to reserve a spot.

February 21, East
March 6, Central
March 9, West 2012

The grassroots leadership Conference is an annual forum that brings together a diverse group of stakeholders throughout the three regions of NC. The goal of the conference is to discuss real issues that impact North Carolinians, to provide participants with an opportunity to engage in dialogue and to learn more about the identified issues.

March 9th, 2012

Agent Training for Support of Beginning Farmers: Land Access, Capital / Credit, and Business Planning

This Training is restricted to ONLY NC Cooperative Extension Employees

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) will facilitate this training focused on making support for beginning farmers an integral part of CEFS’ 10% Campaign. Instructors (noted on registration form) will use a ‘train the trainer’ approach to present and discuss some of the top challenges facing beginning farmers in North Carolina: land access, capital /credit, business planning. This training is supported by the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture. This training is open to all Extension agents, directors and Local Food Coordinators.

Topics: Land Access, Capital /Credit, Business Planning

Instructors: Andrew Branan, Tony Kleese, Rick Larson, Scott Marlow, Noah Ranells (speakers will vary from district to district)

A beginning farmer(s) from the district will speak from his/her experience in getting started, and we also hope to include a peer to peer opportunity to hear successes from an Agent who works regularly with beginning farmers. Instructors will use a ‘train the trainer’ approach to present and discuss some of the top challenges facing beginning farmers in North Carolina.

This project is supported by the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, grant number #2010-49400-21733.

Please contact Joanna Lelekacs with any questions – joanna_lelekacs@ncsu.edu, 919-244-5269.

March 10th, 2012

There is no cost for this workshop, but pre-registration is required by Monday, March 5, 2012. Workshop participants will meet at the CEFS Service Building for a short presentation on blackberry production and management, followed by a pruning and trellis demonstration at the Small Farm Unit. Directions will be provided at the beginning of the workshop. Participants are encouraged to bring hand pruners and loppers and to dress appropriately for outside activity.

March 19-20th, 2012

Monday and Tuesday 9am-4pm (repeat session)
Whole Animal Butchery for Chefs and Farmers with Kari Underly of Range, Inc., Chicago, IL.
Master Butcher Kari Underly demonstrates whole animal butchery of beef and pork. Kari will disassemble an entire side of beef and pork into primal, sub-primal and retail cuts. Topics will include a discussion of meat quality, carcass utilization for chefs and farmers, basic cooking preparations for uncommon cuts, beef value-added shoulder cuts (ie, Denver Steak, Flat Iron, etc.). Time and space will be available for discussion, questions and close observation of meat cutting. See Kari’s Youtube entry for the Who’s Your Butcher Contest and her new book The Art of Beef Cutting: A Meat Professional’s Guide to Butchering and Merchandising.

Monday and Tuesday 9am-4pm (repeat session)
Advanced Charcuterie with Craig Deihl of Cypress, Charleston, SC.
Executive Chef and two time James Beard Award nominee, Craig Deihl is a master in the craft of charcuterie. Spend a day with Craig and learn technique and recipes suitable for the home enthusiast as well as the professional chef. See Michael Ruhlman’s perspective from a recent visit with Craig http://ruhlman.com/2012/01/dry-cured-ham-at-home/.

March 26-28th, 2012

The itinerary for The Cooperative Extension Program at A&T’s annual celebration of small-scale agriculture is set. The kickoff will be Monday, March 26, in Martin County; Tuesday’s (March 27) educational forum will feature tours of two farms where livestock and produce production are innovatively amalgamated, and the educational forum Wednesday morning (March 28) prior to the Small Farmers Recognition Luncheon will include presentations by a number of authorities on increasing profits from livestock production.

Farmers living more than 130 miles from campus who would like to get their name in the hat for lodging, meals and waiver of registration fees for Small Farms Week activities on campus March 26 – 27 have until Feb. 17 to apply for a scholarship. Applicants must rely on farming for at least 50 percent of annual gross income to qualify for scholarships.

The UNC TV program “North Carolina Rising” recently broadcast a feature that previews one of the farmers on the Small Farms week tour, Stanley Hughes, and the owner/operator of the other farm on the tour, Eliza MacLean, was among the farmers interviewed on UNC radio’s “State of Things” in December of 2011.

This information borrowed from the ag-e-dispatch, the electronic newsletter from NCA&T’s School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences

March 27-28th, 2012

The Cooperative Extension Program at North Carolina A&T State University is hosting an educational forum on local livestock marketing during Small Farms Week. The following is a detailed agenda of the two-day forum.

Tuesday, March 27th

Tour of Pine Knot Farms (Stanley Hughes) and Cane Creek Farm (Eliza McLean)

  • 12:30 p.m. Leave Church parking lot (large parking area across from House of Prayer, 101 S Dudley St, Greensboro, NC 27401)
  • 1:15 p.m. Arrive Cane Creek Farm (1203 Longest Acres Rd, Snow Camp, NC 27349)
  • 3:00 p.m. Leave Cane Creek Farm
  • 3:45 p.m. Arrive Pine Knot Farms (8906 Hester Rd, Hurdle Mills, NC, 27541)
  • 4:45 p.m. Leave Pine Knot Farms
  • 5:30 p.m. Arrive Church parking lot

Wednesday, March 28th

Presentations:

  • 9:00 a.m. NC A&T SU campus, Student Union, Stallings Ballroom
    Presentations: Meat cuts and Pricing (Lee Menius), Value-added livestock products (Eliza McLean), Marketing options (Casey McKissick), Food Safety and “Other” Marketing Tools (Dr. Rosalind Dale)
  • 10:00 a.m. Jennifer Curtis, Farmhand Foods
  • 10:20 a.m. Break (taste sausage from Farmhand Foods)
  • 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion with presenters above, additional livestock producers. Foothills Pilot Plant small animal processing representative, Chaudhry Halal Meats large animal processing representative
  • 11:15 Adjourn
March 28th, 2012

This event is sponsored by the NCSU Union Activities Board.

View one of the trailers HERE.
Information taken from official Dirt! The Movie website: All About Dirt

“DIRT! The Movie, tells the amazing and little known story of the relationship between humans and living dirt.

Why Dirt?

Dirt feeds us and gives us shelter. Dirt holds and cleans our water. Dirt heals us and makes us beautiful. Dirt regulates the earth’s climate. Dirt is the ultimate natural resource for all life on earth.

Yet most humans ignore, abuse, and destroy our most precious living natural resource. Consider the results of such behavior: mass starvation, drought, floods, and global warming, and wars. If we continue on our current path, Dirt might find another use for humans, as compost for future life forms.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Another world, in which we treat dirt with the respect it deserves, is possible and we’ll show you how.

The film offers a vision of a sustainable relationship between Humans and Dirt through profiles of the global visionaries who are determined to repair the damage we’ve done before it’s too late. There are many ways we can preserve the living skin of the earth for future generations. If you care about your food, water, the air you breathe, your health and happiness… it’s time to see DIRT! The Movie, roll up your sleeves for action and Get Dirty.”

Panelists:

Julie Grossman (Moderator): My work broadly explores the ways in which we can better manage plant-soil-microbe relationships in order to enhance soil fertility with the ultimate goal of developing sustainable food production systems. The overarching goal of my research program is to enhance the efficient management of soil nutrients in low-input and organic farming systems. I do this by conducting basic and applied research that will increase our understanding of how agricultural management affects the cycling of nutrients via soil microbial processes. Organic farmers and those with limited resources are often put in a tricky spot of growing food crops without purchased inputs such as synthetic fertilizers. This increases their reliance on less understood soil microbial processes to provide their crop plants with critical nutrients needed for growth and development. Read More…

Jeana Myers has a PhD in Soil Science from NC State University and worked at the NCDA Soil Testing Lab for five years prior to becoming the Horticulture Agent for Wake County in January. She and her husband garden their 0.3 acre urban lot intensively, with over 50 fruit and vegetable varieties, chickens, solar hot water, water catchment, frog ponds, and a lay bread oven.

Mike Ortosky is a registered Landscape Architect and NC Licensed Soil Scientist. He is a graduate of NC State University and worked with USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service before co- founding Soil & Environmental Consultants in Raleigh in 1989. He served there as environmental consultant and designer until becoming President in 2004. In 2009, following his interest in community development and sustainable agriculture, he started the Earthwise Company where he and business partner Tony Kleese provide community and agriculture consulting, design, development, and management services today.

Dale Threatt-Taylor is Wake Soil and Water Conservation District Director. She received a Bachelor of Science in Conservation from NC State University in 1991, beginning her career as a Soil Conservationist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in Orange County. She later joined the Wake Soil and Water Conservation District as a Conservation Technician and progressively moved into one of the Natural Resource Conservationist positions. In August 2008 the Wake Soil and Water Conservation District Board of Supervisors appointed her as District Administrator (now District Director). Read More…

About this Parks Scholars Project:

CEFS has been mentoring four NCSU Park Scholars for the past academic year. The pinnacle of their project was to create, organize, advertise and draw an audience for people passionate about the environment and interested in learning more. The Scholars have had full class loads, extra-curricular activities and even internships during this year-long endeavor. This final project speaks volumes about the maturity and dedication of these Park Scholar Students.

May 3rd, 2012

Join us as we showcase some of the research being done at CEFS. The event will include an open house,farm tour, poster session, equipment demonstrations, presentation on key research in the various farm units. See schedule of events below.

11:00 a.m. Open houses at Small Farm Unit and Community Engagement Sites.
12:30 p.m. – Registration opens; poster viewing
1 p.m. – Field Day

The field day includes farm tours, distinguished guests, equipment demonstrations and presentations on key research work in the various farm units.

Farm tours will highlight activities in the following areas:

  • Tour 1 — Farming Systems Research Unit (systems overview and soil and water research), outdoor swine, and agroforestry.
  • Tour 2 — Organic Research Unit — small grains breeding, natural habitats, canola, and cover crop mulches.
  • Tour 3 — Livestock Units — extending the winter grazing season with annuals and pasture management, beef cattle breeds, dairy and milking parlor (fly management and cross-breeding), and riparian buffers.
May 12th, 2012

Joins us as we visit three Johnston County goat farms that are cooperating with the NCSU Meat Goat and Forages Program and implementing rotational grazing. You will learn about mixing legumes (clovers, pea and lespedeza) and grasses (fescue and orchardgrass) to extend the grazing season and add nitrogen to your pastures. The farm tour and hosts include: Gordon and Leslie Averill (Selma), Bob and Rebecca Gessner (Selma) and James Paul & Saundra Allen (Smithfield, NC).

May 17th, 2012

Whether you are growing in large fields or home gardens, cover crops can improve your soil while reducing weeds and labor. Learn what cover crops work best in North Carolina, and how to reap their benefits. For more information contact Dr. Charlie Raczkowski at 336-334-7779 or raczkowc@ncat.edu.

Sponsored by the Agricultural Research Program at NCA&T State University

May 23rd, 2012

This workshop will provide an overview of ecosystem services and practices and programs designed to enhance them. Practices for the farm and home landscapes will be presented. Field demonstrations will focus on establishment and maintenance of habitats to provide life cycle needs of native plants, wildlife, predatory and parasitic insects, and pollinators.

May 30th, Nash County
May 31st, Orange County, 2012

Dr. David Orr, Department of Entomology at NCSU has been working with Tony Kleese of the Earthwise Company and eight NC organic growers for the past two years to evaluate the establishment of beneficial insect habitat on working organic farms. They tested a model that allows farmers to access cost share support from NRCS for habitat establishment. Two field days are being offered to view plots and share experiences and resources. The workshops are free and registration is not required. Call or email questions to Tony Kleese, 919 622 5897, tkleeses@earthwiselife.com.

Establishing Beneficial Insect Habitat in Nash County
Agenda:
6:00 to 6:10 – Habitat design considerations – Dr David Orr, NCSU Entomology
6:10 to 6:20 – Habitat establishment practices – Tony Kleese, Earthwise Company LLC
6:20 to 6:30 – Tour habitat site in year two of establishment and Q&A

Held in conjunction with the NCSU Organic Grain Project’s Nash County Organic Canola Field Tour from 5 to 6 p.m.

Establishing Beneficial Insect Habitat in Orange County

5:30 to 5:45 – Introductions, Habitat design considerations – Dr David Orr, NCSU Entomology
5:45 to 6:00 – Habitat establishment practices – Tony Kleese, Earthwise Company LLC
6:00 to 6:15 – Tour habitat site in year three of establishment and Q&A
6:15 to 6:30 – Whitted Bowers Farm’s approach to beneficial insect habitat – Rob and Cheri Bowers

This is a project of NC State University and is funded by the USDA-CSREES-Integrated Organic Program and the USDA-NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant Program.

June 21st, 2012

Farm Tour Sites: Pastured poultry, alley cropping: pecan trees and watermelons, mixed grazing: meat goats and hair sheep, managing parasites in small ruminants, managing pests on collards.

June 21st, 2012

This workshop will expose the audience to the problems facing producers with respect to small ruminant gastrointestinal parasite control, the biology of the barber pole worm (H. contortus), a quick review of dewormers, understanding parasite drug resistance versus animal resistance, susceptibility or resilience, the concepts of smart drenching and FAMACHA©, and how to integrate smart drenching, FAMACHA and pasture management for more effective gastrointestinal parasite control. On-going research concerning non-chemical approaches to treating small ruminant with traditional dewormers such as alternative forages will be discussed.

The hands-on session will be held following the lecture to certify participants on how to use the FAMACHA© card as an effective management tool.

For more information contact: Margaret A. Bell, Livestock Agent, Craven & Jones Counties, 252-633-1477 or Eileen Coite, Extension Agent, Agriculture, Livestock & Forages, Wayne County, 919-731-1520.

July 12th, 2012

Recent research has shown that meat goat production systems in the southeastern USA should be designed to take advantage of the goats’ natural preference for browse. Trees could contribute to system productivity by supplying required nutrients when demand by growing animals is critical and the quality of forage is limited. Research has also begun to evaluate the potential for goat silvopasture production with hardwood species. A field study has been established in Wayne County, NC to evaluate the establishment and early growth characteristics of three leguminous tree species Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis Schneid), and Mimosa (Albiziajulibrissin Durazz).Participants will take part in discussions and hands-on demonstrations that will try to answer the following questions:

  • What are the effects of wide spacing, pruning, and fertilization on the production and quality of wood and forage?
  • What is the efficiency of multi-row and multi-species tree planting vs. single-row and single-species plantings for converting open areas to silvopastures?
  • How do the tree and forage components interact to compete for light, water, and nutrients?
  • Are there economic analysis models that are operational at the regiona